Richard Smith

Smith_ChocolateBoxesSet21091B_.jpg
Smith_ChocolateBoxesSet21091A_.jpg
Smith_ChocolateBoxesSet21091B_.jpg
Smith_ChocolateBoxesSet21091A_.jpg

Richard Smith

600.00

Chocolate Boxes (Pair)

Lithograph (Set of 2) ed. 58/70
27 x 27 1/4 inches each
Signed Lower Left

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Associated with the Pop Art Movement, he was born in Letchworth, Hertfordshire, England and after military service with Royal Air Force in Hong Kong, he studied at St Albans School of Art and later undertook post-graduate studies at the Royal College of Art in London. He went to New York in 1959 on a Harkness Fellowship. Pop was not yet a movement, but in Britain elements of it had already appeared in the works of Richard Hamilton, Eduardo Paolozzi and Peter Blake, who was a student with Mr. Smith at the Royal College of Art in the mid-50's. Mr. Smith returned to England later in the 60's and did not settle in New York again until 1978.

Influenced by painters like Mark Rothko and Kenneth Noland, he turned toward pure color, often displayed on shaped, three-dimensional canvases. These evolved, in the ’70s and ’80s, into a series of kite-like works, in which traditional wooden stretcher bars were replaced by a support structure of aluminum rods, allowing the painting to be suspended from the wall or ceiling by strings or ribbons.

Mr. Smith was given a retrospective exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in 1966, when he was still in his 30s, and represented Britain at the 1970 Venice Biennale. In 1975 he was the subject of a retrospective at the Tate Gallery, which described him, tellingly, as β€œan odd artist, at once in and out of touch with the currents in the mainstream.”

Many of his works are multicolored abstractions based on images and objects from everyday life. His often outsized canvases with their lush, seductive colors combine the formal qualities of American abstract painters with references to American commercial culture.

biography taken from askART.com