Frederick Lohmann

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Lohmann_GreenDingy_CMYKrgb_lowres.jpg

Frederick Lohmann

1,450.00

The Green Dingey

Oil on Board

15 1/x 18 1/2 inches

Signed Lower Right

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FREDERICK DENNIS LOHMANN (December 18, 1880 – July 27, 1964)

Painter, illustrator and designer.  Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, the son of Mary Ellen “Minnie” Collins (1860 – 1928) and Frederick Lohmann (1853 – 1918).  His father was employed in the cigar industry in Cincinnati, where the family resided on Central Avenue.

Lohmann was active in the Cincinnati Art Club (he likely studied there) before 1906 and was first employed as a designer in the lithography business as early as 1907.  Between 1908 and 1915 he created illustrations which were selected for publication in Life magazine.  Following the untimely death of his young wife, Marie, in 1913, he moved back home to live with his parents, who were then residing on Jefferson Avenue in Cincinnati.  

By the time World War I broke out he was working for the Henderson Lithographing Company as an advertising artist.  The company, which flourished in the early part of the twentieth century, was known for their large, paper advertising prints.  During this same period he served as Vice-President (1916-17) of the Cincinnati Art Club.  After the war was concluded he was soon operating his own design business in Cincinnati and over the next several decades was listed in city directories alternatively as a designer or an artist.

Working with other members of the Cincinnati Art Club in 1927, including John Rettig (1855 – 1932), John Weis (1892 – 1962) and Herman Wessel (1878 – 1969), he created a composite painting of the president of the club, Ernest B. Haswell, which was then auctioned to benefit the club’s activities.  And by 1930 he had been selected to represent his employer alongside other prominent artists at the University of Cincinnati’s series “Contemporary Problems in Art,” where participants discussed current data on new art trends.  He also served as a judge for the 1935 Hamilton County American Legion Auxiliary poster contest.

In addition to working for magazines, Lohmann also illustrated books, including Mary Nancy Graham’s Christmas Carols (1938) and Karl Schulte’s popular music book (1938) of the same title.  In 1948, he was elected as an honorary board member of the Cincinnati Art Club, receiving this honor alongside fellow Cincinnati artists, Paul Ashbrook (1867 – 1949), Martin Dumler (1868 – 1958), S. W. Kolde and Herman Wessel. 

Frederick Dennis Lohmann died on Monday, the 27th of July 1964 at the age of eighty-three years.  His service was held from an unknown location and he was buried in the Lohmann family plot in Garden LN, Section 115, Lot 87 of Spring Grove Cemetery, located in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio.

As Lohmann worked primarily as an illustrator and designer, his paintings are fairly uncommon.  When they do appear, they are usually impressionistic in nature and are signed “F. Lohmann.”  At some point during his career, he changed his surname by dropping the second “N,” eventually going by the name “Fred Lohman.”

Though there are undoubtedly other exhibitions in which Lohmann participated, those presently known include the following:  Cincinnati Art Club, Cincinnati, OH, c. 1906-1958.  Lohmann’s works are not known to be in any public collections at present, though a number reside in private collections throughout the United States.

--Biography written by Geoffrey Fleming, Executive Director, Huntington Museum of Art